Akureyri

The largest town outside Greater Reykjavík, is situated on the inner section of Eyjafjörður. It is an old trading station, the oldest references being from 1602. Today, Akureyri is still the centre for trade, services and communications in north Iceland. In addition, there is a long tradition of processing marine and agricultural products. It is also a centre of education, and has two higher secondary schools, a music school, an art school and a university.
 
In Akureyri distances are short, so shopping is easy. The town has the greatest selection of goods and services outside the capital area. Akureyri takes pride in its array of cafés and restaurants. Its pubs and clubs make for a vibrant nightlife, and the numerous fitness studios and health spas in the town are excellent places to spend some time, whether for relaxation or physical exertion.

Tourists can enjoy diverse leisure activities yearround

Culture: Akureyri has a wide variety of museums and galleries that hold regular exhibitions. These include the Akureyri Art Museum and the Akureyri Museum, which offers a diverse summer programme of walks, “working days”, evening entertainment with song, and an exhibition at the Nonnahús museum. Numerous galleries featuring events and exhibitions are located in Listagil, and the Akureyri Theatre Company features a vigorous line-up of plays during its winter season.
 

Outdoor activities: one of the most popular tourist spots in the town in summer is the Akureyri Public Park and Botanical Garden. The Akureyri outdoor recreation area in Kjarnaskógur forrest and the Scouts’ area in Hamrar are suitable for all age groups, with walking/hiking paths, playground equipment and picnic areas. Akureyri is the main winter sports site in Iceland and prides itself on having the best skiing facilities in the country among other leisure activities are guided hiking trips, birdwatching and bike-, boat and horse rentals.

 Hiking – walking paths

There are manyenjoyable hiking/walking paths in and around Akureyri, for example along the Glerá river, through the inner town, in Glerárdalur valley, and onto Súlur, the peaks that rise to some 1144 metres above the town. Free hiking/walking maps may be obtained from the Tourist Information
Centre.

For more information visit Akureyrarstofa website






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